How a Famous Teacher Introduces Real Life Lessons To His Students

How a Famous Teacher Introduces Real Life Lessons To His Students

A New Interview with John Taylor Gatto!

We were able to get a few short but fascinating answers from Gatto about his unique and highly entertaining new book.

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A Mom's Comment on Reading Classics

A Mom's Comment on Reading Classics

I always recommend educating children with the classics, so I'm going to share a comment with you from one of my Lost Tools Curriculum moms, that made me really happy to read. But, first let me say that if your children grow up reading classic literature, they will always be able to read difficult literature, and all doors to great literature and knowledge will be open to them. Not to mention that they will be able to think, speak, and write at higher levels, too. Reading the classics also trains us in understanding human nature; why people do the things they do and how to recognize the good person from the bad person, to put it simply. Shakespeare was the all-time master of this. Here is the comment from my customer, especially for those of you who fear the classics might be too difficult:

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Mom, Is There Any Dinner Tonight?

Mom, Is There Any Dinner Tonight?

Some mothers are very good about cooking daily meals for their families, especially if they have emigrated from foreign countries where family meals are still common, but American-born mothers have let this practice go more than we realize.  I have been one of those moms. 

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How Degrading Is The System of Grading?

How Degrading Is The System of Grading?

While grading students on a bell curve may make some sense in a college setting, it's a harmful system for measuring the comprehension and knowledge of younger students. The Bell curve was designed to determine where each student ranked in relation to the rest of the group, but each child has a unique mind that is developing at its own rate and understands things in its own time, and, therefore, to compare a child's ability to those of his peers defies common sense. 

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Hacking Your Education by Dale J. Stephens

Hacking Your Education by Dale J. Stephens

I almost didn’t read this book. At first glance the book seemed a bit frivolous, and the author seemed too young, but I have a 17 year-old daughter who was homeschooled and extended the “no school” philosophy to college, so I decided to give it a quick read. This book has been surprising and I think it is worth reading, especially for goal-driven parents who have difficulty grasping the idea of a valid education outside the system. 

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Welcome

For years I’ve been asked to start a blog, but the days roll by, the months become a blink of an eye, and the years disappear. As a homeschooling, working mother whose duty is near an end, my days are a little less hectic than they have been for the last 18 years and the space for my blog has actually emerged. It’s heaven to be able to sit back and relax! If you are a mother of young children, the word “relax” probably no longer exists in your vocabulary, but I’m here to tell you that it will again one day, and that day comes ever so fast.

Having said that, officially, this is the start of my blog. I intend to do what most people with blogs do; to share my thoughts on raising and educating children with anyone who might be interested, to post relevant links to articles and books, to feature the writings of prominent thinkers in education, to share the wisdoms of more literate times, to address some of the follies about raising and educating children being promoted in mainstream media today, and to offer encouragement for those of you working hard to make a difference in children's lives, whether your own children or those of others.

My concern is for humanity, and my focus is on the children.